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On the death bed — Katsu!

Tag: cd21 (page 1 of 9)

DIY drone surveillance for protesters

Another development in protester counter intelligence. Protesters in Warsaw recently used a small drone helicopter equipped with a camera to monitor police activity. Very cool.

The next step is using 3D printers to crank out more advanced models.

We’re still talking tactics here, not strategy, but very useful tactics.

Reading List Added

Hello, yes, the site has been pretty quiet for a while now. Between prepping for the last workshop, traveling, decompressing from traveling, and getting my life back in order I haven’t had much time to work on civil resistance stuff. But that’s changing! Lots more to come soon, and for now enjoy then new reading list page where I’ve uploaded lots of great articles that have informed my thinking. Good reading while you’re trapped indoors during a hurricane.

Stuxnet

I’m reading Neuromancer now, so this video about “code as a weapon” jumped out at me. I’m still not sure how much of the hacker talk these days is hype, and plenty of .mil folks have obvious motivations to scare the public about cyber threats and viruses crashing trains and taking down power grids and all the rest. That said, as more and more systems connect to the integrated info grid and store their data in the cloud, it’s inevitable that weaponized viruses will appear with the capacity to do serious damage. Whether it’s now or a decade from now.

Stuxnet: Anatomy of a Computer Virus from Patrick Clair on Vimeo.

Hackers Are Everywhere. Panic!

Kind of shocking to see the phrase “false flag events” in PC magazine. I’m inclined to think LulzSec is legit, but who knows?

Out of the blue, Citigroup was hacked, then the CIA, and then the FBI and other groups were hacked. Now I’m finding this a little odd and wondering who is being set up here. Supposedly, some of the hacks of government agencies stem from the arrest of a few hackers in Europe. This is an attempt to make the hackers appear to be online versions of Hezbollah, as there are retaliatory attacks reported. You know, the way terrorists would do it.

It’s all possible, but I’m suspicious of the whole scene. These hackers, who are normally casual in their approach, are made to look like bomb throwing Trotskyites from the 1920s, each wielding a Molotov cocktail and out to overthrow the government.

This above mental image, of course, is for public benefit. By making any one of these hackers appear to be a horrendous threat to public safety, a number of initiatives can be rushed through Congress. All sorts of onerous laws will be passed, which probably will not affect the scene at all but will allow more government intrusion into the Internet. It will become illegal to sell any programming tools that can be used by a hacker, despite the usefulness of these tools to security experts. It will also become a felony to attempt to deconstruct a password or enter a system for whatever reason.

I have predicted for years that at some point people are going to have to be registered and licensed to use the Internet at all. You can see it coming as clear as day. These hackers, of course, have to be stopped, and this is how they’ll do it.

There are events in history known as false flag events. These are staged by a government usually to distress the public, so the government can do something that the public would otherwise disapprove.

Adam Curtis makes the illest shit

Hackers reveal government-corporate surveillance plot

Take it as a given that governments and corporations have a vested interest in surveilling the population and subtly swaying it’s opinions. Also accept that they sacrifice a considerable percentage of their profits to further those interests. Also interesting here, it was the dreaded hackers, the new terrorist threat, who brought this information to light.

Via: Guardian

After having spent several months studying those emails and otherwise investigating the industry depicted therein, I have revealed my summary of a classified US intelligence programme known as Romas/COIN, as well as its upcoming replacement, known as Odyssey. The programme appears to allow for the large-scale monitoring of social networks by way of such things as natural language processing, semantic analysis, latent semantic indexing and IT intrusion. At the same time, it also entails the dissemination of some unknown degree of information to a given population through a variety of means – without any hint that the actual source is US intelligence. Scattered discussions of Arab translation services may indicate that the programme targets the Middle East.

Toronto police swear off kettling

See also: Suke

via: Boing Boing

A year after the G20 summit in Toronto, the Toronto police have promised to permanently abandon the practice of “kettling,” through which groups of demonstrators and passers-by are gathered into a police line and held indefinitely without charge or judicial oversight. Kettling is a form of extrajudicial detention, and has been found illegal in many jurisdictions around the world. The G20 summit saw the largest mass-arrest in Canadian history, though practically no charges were laid:

CopWatch and OpenWatch: covert recording apps for interactions with authority figures

About the OpenWatch Project from OpenWatch on Vimeo.

via: Boing Boing

OpenWatch is a project that publishes open/free apps for Android and iOS; the apps (called “OpenWatch Recorder” and “CopRecorder”) covertly record audio and, at your direction, transmits it to the OpenWatch site. There, it is reviewed for significance, stripped of personal information, and published. It also has a video mode. The OpenWatch site looks for regional patterns in authority-figure interactions — for example, whether a county operates its drunk-driving checkpoints in an illegal fashion.

Markus Kayser Builds a Solar-Powered 3D Printer that Prints Glass from Sand and a Sun-Powered Cutter

Markus Kayser – Sun Cutter Project from Markus Kayser on Vimeo.

This is what democracy looks like.

Industrial designer and tinkerer Markus Kayser spent the better part of a year building and experimenting with two fantastic devices that harness the sun’s power in some of the world’s harshest climates. The first he calls a Sun Cutter, a low-tech light cutter that uses a large ball lens to focus the sun’s rays onto a surface that’s moved by a cam-guided system. As the surface moves under the magnified light it cuts 2D components like a laser. The project was tested for the first time in August 2010 in the Egyptian desert and Kayser used thin plywood to create the parts for a few pairs of pretty sweet shades. But he didn’t stop there.

Six Designs For Houses That Cost Just $300 To Build


Fast Company

Shelter is one of humanity’s most basic needs. But a house is a luxury beyond the wildest dreams of most people in the developed world–leading to dangerous and unsanitary shantytowns, which compound the problems of poverty and disease. The $300 House Project, for which designers were asked to figure out a way to construct a simple house for $300 or less, aimed to solve this problem, by creating cheap and simple to build houses that could be built on a massive scale. The winners–judged by luminaries like Yves Behar and Umair Haque–were recently announced.

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