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On the death bed — Katsu!

Tag: DIY

Markus Kayser Builds a Solar-Powered 3D Printer that Prints Glass from Sand and a Sun-Powered Cutter

Markus Kayser – Sun Cutter Project from Markus Kayser on Vimeo.

This is what democracy looks like.

Industrial designer and tinkerer Markus Kayser spent the better part of a year building and experimenting with two fantastic devices that harness the sun’s power in some of the world’s harshest climates. The first he calls a Sun Cutter, a low-tech light cutter that uses a large ball lens to focus the sun’s rays onto a surface that’s moved by a cam-guided system. As the surface moves under the magnified light it cuts 2D components like a laser. The project was tested for the first time in August 2010 in the Egyptian desert and Kayser used thin plywood to create the parts for a few pairs of pretty sweet shades. But he didn’t stop there.

Six Designs For Houses That Cost Just $300 To Build


Fast Company

Shelter is one of humanity’s most basic needs. But a house is a luxury beyond the wildest dreams of most people in the developed world–leading to dangerous and unsanitary shantytowns, which compound the problems of poverty and disease. The $300 House Project, for which designers were asked to figure out a way to construct a simple house for $300 or less, aimed to solve this problem, by creating cheap and simple to build houses that could be built on a massive scale. The winners–judged by luminaries like Yves Behar and Umair Haque–were recently announced.

Open Design Now

Design is undergoing a revolution. Technology is empowering more people to create and disseminate designs, and professionals and enthusiasts are using it to share their work with the world. Open design is changing everything from furniture to how designers make a living.

Open Design Now: Why Design Cannot Remain Exclusive surveys this emerging field for the first time. Insiders including John Thackara, Droog Design’s Renny Ramakers and Bre Pettis look at what’s driving open design and where it’s going. They examine new business models and issues of copyright, sustainability and social critique. Case studies show how projects ranging from the RepRap self-replicating 3D-printer to $50 prosthetic legs are changing the world.

Hidden Workshops Add to Libyan Rebels’ Arsenal

Like the Pakistani gun market video, ignore the violent intentions here and just consider how exciting it is to see people working together, being inventive and learning new skills, repurposing old technology, etc. It’s like punk metal works.


via: NYT

Bryan Denton for The New York Times

MISURATA, Libya — When the bloody siege of this isolated city began, the rebels who rose against Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s conventional army had almost no firearms. Many of them relied on hands, knives and stones.

Metalworkers mounted a rocket pod, usually fired from an aircraft, to a pickup truck. The rebels remain materially outmatched, but their fighting power has grown. More Photos »

Now they roam the streets as a paramilitary force built around hastily armored trucks that have been fitted with captured machine guns set on crude turrets and mounts.

The transformation, evident in an offensive late last month that chased many of Colonel Qaddafi’s forces from Misurata’s center to its outskirts, is in part the result of a hidden side of this lopsided ground war: a clandestine network of rebel workshops, where these makeshift weapons have been designed, assembled and pushed out.

Open Source Ecology

A fascinating project, though certainly one still in its infancy (or maybe toddler years). This is one of the new directions I think CD needs to move in.

Open Source Ecology

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