So Much This

On the death bed — Katsu!

Tag: tools (page 1 of 2)

Reading List Added

Hello, yes, the site has been pretty quiet for a while now. Between prepping for the last workshop, traveling, decompressing from traveling, and getting my life back in order I haven’t had much time to work on civil resistance stuff. But that’s changing! Lots more to come soon, and for now enjoy then new reading list page where I’ve uploaded lots of great articles that have informed my thinking. Good reading while you’re trapped indoors during a hurricane.

Stuxnet

I’m reading Neuromancer now, so this video about “code as a weapon” jumped out at me. I’m still not sure how much of the hacker talk these days is hype, and plenty of .mil folks have obvious motivations to scare the public about cyber threats and viruses crashing trains and taking down power grids and all the rest. That said, as more and more systems connect to the integrated info grid and store their data in the cloud, it’s inevitable that weaponized viruses will appear with the capacity to do serious damage. Whether it’s now or a decade from now.

Stuxnet: Anatomy of a Computer Virus from Patrick Clair on Vimeo.

CopWatch and OpenWatch: covert recording apps for interactions with authority figures

About the OpenWatch Project from OpenWatch on Vimeo.

via: Boing Boing

OpenWatch is a project that publishes open/free apps for Android and iOS; the apps (called “OpenWatch Recorder” and “CopRecorder”) covertly record audio and, at your direction, transmits it to the OpenWatch site. There, it is reviewed for significance, stripped of personal information, and published. It also has a video mode. The OpenWatch site looks for regional patterns in authority-figure interactions — for example, whether a county operates its drunk-driving checkpoints in an illegal fashion.

Markus Kayser Builds a Solar-Powered 3D Printer that Prints Glass from Sand and a Sun-Powered Cutter

Markus Kayser – Sun Cutter Project from Markus Kayser on Vimeo.

This is what democracy looks like.

Industrial designer and tinkerer Markus Kayser spent the better part of a year building and experimenting with two fantastic devices that harness the sun’s power in some of the world’s harshest climates. The first he calls a Sun Cutter, a low-tech light cutter that uses a large ball lens to focus the sun’s rays onto a surface that’s moved by a cam-guided system. As the surface moves under the magnified light it cuts 2D components like a laser. The project was tested for the first time in August 2010 in the Egyptian desert and Kayser used thin plywood to create the parts for a few pairs of pretty sweet shades. But he didn’t stop there.

Open Design Now

Design is undergoing a revolution. Technology is empowering more people to create and disseminate designs, and professionals and enthusiasts are using it to share their work with the world. Open design is changing everything from furniture to how designers make a living.

Open Design Now: Why Design Cannot Remain Exclusive surveys this emerging field for the first time. Insiders including John Thackara, Droog Design’s Renny Ramakers and Bre Pettis look at what’s driving open design and where it’s going. They examine new business models and issues of copyright, sustainability and social critique. Case studies show how projects ranging from the RepRap self-replicating 3D-printer to $50 prosthetic legs are changing the world.

New malware steals your Bitcoin

via: Ars Technica

In a sure sign that the virtual currency Bitcoin has hit the mainstream, a new Trojan horse program discovered in the wild Thursday seeks out and steals victims’ Bitcoin wallets, the same way other malware goes for their banking passwords or credit card numbers.

Financing the revolution


Again, throwing up some links I don’t have time to read now.

Immigrant loan pools

Hawala

Bitcoin

Hidden Workshops Add to Libyan Rebels’ Arsenal

Like the Pakistani gun market video, ignore the violent intentions here and just consider how exciting it is to see people working together, being inventive and learning new skills, repurposing old technology, etc. It’s like punk metal works.


via: NYT

Bryan Denton for The New York Times

MISURATA, Libya — When the bloody siege of this isolated city began, the rebels who rose against Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s conventional army had almost no firearms. Many of them relied on hands, knives and stones.

Metalworkers mounted a rocket pod, usually fired from an aircraft, to a pickup truck. The rebels remain materially outmatched, but their fighting power has grown. More Photos »

Now they roam the streets as a paramilitary force built around hastily armored trucks that have been fitted with captured machine guns set on crude turrets and mounts.

The transformation, evident in an offensive late last month that chased many of Colonel Qaddafi’s forces from Misurata’s center to its outskirts, is in part the result of a hidden side of this lopsided ground war: a clandestine network of rebel workshops, where these makeshift weapons have been designed, assembled and pushed out.

The Gun Markets of Pakistan

I’d like to see one of these in the US. But with home solar power kits and DIY hydroponic set ups and pirate radio equipment instead of AK’s.

Open Source Ecology

A fascinating project, though certainly one still in its infancy (or maybe toddler years). This is one of the new directions I think CD needs to move in.

Open Source Ecology

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